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(Source: forfales, via teacoffeebooks)

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the-book-ferret:

A beautiful Owl Necklace I got at Salt Lake City Comic Con 2014 from Unpossible Cuts

the-book-ferret:

A beautiful Owl Necklace I got at Salt Lake City Comic Con 2014 from Unpossible Cuts

(via teachingliteracy)

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"She also considered very seriously what she would look like in a little cottage in the middle of the forest, dressed in a melancholy gray and holding communion only with the birds and trees; a life of retirement away from the vain world; a life into which no man came. It had its attractions, but she decided that gray did not suit her."
A.A. Milne, Once on a Time (via mustikkamouse)

(via flyingclub-cup)

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It’s nearly time 

(Source: photosetavenue, via whatdeannadid)

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my-ponchoboys:

Karen for Glamour Magazine

my-ponchoboys:

Karen for Glamour Magazine

(via impossiblelittleclara)

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staceythinx:

Orbital Mechanics by Tatiana Plakhova 

(Source: fubiz.net, via dinthevoyager)

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watershedplus:

On rare years when the conditions are right in the arid landscape of the Badlands, in the American West, wildflowers burst into a display of colour for just a few days.
The vegetation in the region has adapted to the climate, with just a small amount of moisture the desert can become coloured with sweeping fields of Scorpion Weed, Beeplant and the flowers of the Pincushion Cacti. These blooms can be very short-lived to conserve moisture.

Photographs by Guy Tal

From here

(via cosetteantoinette)

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springwise:

This ring lets blind people read non-Braille books
One of the problems with Braille is that it’s typically printed in specialist books aside from the copies created for sighted people, meaning that those with sight difficulties can’t borrow their friends’ books and need to seek out the bookstores and libraries that cater for them. In the past, we’ve seen projects such as Thailand’sMr. Light and Mr. Dark — which uses special typography to enable the blind and non-blind to read the same book. Now the FingerReader initiative from MIT provides visually impaired readers with a wearable ring that can scan written text and read it out loud. READ MORE…

springwise:

This ring lets blind people read non-Braille books

One of the problems with Braille is that it’s typically printed in specialist books aside from the copies created for sighted people, meaning that those with sight difficulties can’t borrow their friends’ books and need to seek out the bookstores and libraries that cater for them. In the past, we’ve seen projects such as Thailand’sMr. Light and Mr. Dark — which uses special typography to enable the blind and non-blind to read the same book. Now the FingerReader initiative from MIT provides visually impaired readers with a wearable ring that can scan written text and read it out loud. READ MORE…

(via supersoldieress)

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bluepueblo:

Forest Path, Bavaria, Germany
photo via besttravelphotos

bluepueblo:

Forest Path, Bavaria, Germany

photo via besttravelphotos

(via dropitlikefscottt)